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Book Details

  • Paperback
  • November 2007
  • ISBN 978-0-393-92498-5
  • 5.7 × 9.3 in / 656 pages
  • Territory Rights: Worldwide


Blake's Poetry and Designs

Norton Critical Editions

Second Edition

Paperback

William Blake (Author), John E. Grant (Editor, University of Iowa Emeritus), Mary Lynn Johnson (Editor, University of Iowa Emeritus)

 

The Second Edition of this revered Norton Critical Edition is the most comprehensive introduction to Blake’s poetry and thought available.

In addition to a broad selection of the poems, the volume includes over 100 images (16 in color), emphasizing the centrality of pictorial representations to Blake’s verse. Biographical context is provided through dozens of excerpts from Blake’s notebook, letters, marginalia, and other writings. “Criticism” offers twenty wide-ranging commentaries by writers from Blake’s contemporaries to present-day critics, among them Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Northrop Frye, Allen Ginsberg, Morris Eaves, Harold Bloom, Alicia Ostriker, John Mee, Saree Makdisi, and Julia Wright. A section on Textual Technicalities, a Chronology of Blake’s life and work, a Selected Bibliography, and an Index of Titles and First Lines are also included.

    Preface to the Second Edition

    Introduction

    List of Illustrations

    List of Key Terms

    The Texts of Blake’s Poetry and Designs

    ILLUMINATED WORKS

    1. All Religions Are One (1788)
    2. There Is No Natural Religion (1788)
    3. Songs of Innocence and of Experience (1789-94)
    4. Songs of Innocence (1789)
      1. Introduction
      2. The Shepherd
      3. The Ecchoing Green
      4. The Lamb
      5. The Little Black Boy
      6. The Blossom
      7. The Chimney Sweeper
      8. The Little Boy Lost
      9. The Little Boy Found
      10. Laughing Song
      11. A Cradle Song
      12. The Divine Image
      13. Holy Thursday
      14. Night
      15. Spring
      16. Nurse’s Song
      17. Infant Joy
      18. A Dream
      19. On Another’s Sorrow
    5. Songs of Experience (1793)
      1. Introduction
      2. Earth’s Answer
      3. The Clod & the Pebble
      4. Holy Thursday
      5. The Little Girl Lost
      6. The Little Girl Found
      7. The Chimney Sweeper
      8. Nurse’s Song
      9. The Sick Rose
      10. The Fly
      11. The Angel
      12. The Tyger
      13. My Pretty Rose Tree
      14. Ah! Sun-Flower
      15. The Lilly
      16. The Garden of Love
      17. The Little Vagabond
      18. London
      19. The Human Abstract
      20. Infant Sorrow
      21. A Poison Tree
      22. A Little Boy Lost
      23. A Little Girl Lost
      24. To Tirzah
      25. The School-Boy
      26. The Voice of the Ancient Bard
      27. A Divine Image
    6. The Book of Thel (1789)
    7. Visions of the Daughters of Albion (1793)
    8. The Marriage of Heaven and Hell (1790)
    9. America (1793)
    10. Europe (1794)
    11. The Song of Los (1794)
      1. Africa
      2. Asia
    12. The Book of Urizen (1794)
    13. The Book of Ahania (1794)
    14. The Book of Los (1794)
    15. Milton (1804; c. 1810-18)
    16. Jerusalem (1804; c. 1820)
    17. For the Sexes: The Gates of Paradise (1820)
      1. “Mutual Forgiveness of each Vice”
      2. The Keys of the Gates
      3. To the Accuser who is The God of This World
    18. The Ghost of Abel (1822)
    19. On Homer’s Poetry / On Virgil (1822)
    20. Yah & His Two Sons Satan & Adam [The Laocoön] (1826)

    OTHER WRITINGS

    1. From Poetical Sketches (1783)
      1. To Spring
      2. To Summer
      3. To Autumn
      4. To Winter
      5. To the Evening Star
      6. Song (“How sweet I roam’d from field to field”)
      7. Song (“Love and harmony combine”)
      8. Mad Song
      9. To the Muses
    2. [An Island in the Moon] (1785)
    3. To the Public [Prospectus] (1793)
    4. From The Notebook (1787-1818)
      1. London (drafts c. 1792)
      2. The Tyger (drafts c. 1792)
      3. Infant Sorrow (drafts, date uncertain)
      4. Motto to the Songs of Innocence & of Experience
      5. A cradle song
      6. “I heard an Angel singing”
      7. An ancient Proverb
      8. “Why should I care for the men of thames”
      9. How to know Love From Deceit
      10. “O lapwing thou fliest around the heath”
      11. “Thou hast a lap full of seed”
      12. “The sword sung on the barren heath”
      13. “If you trap the moment before its ripe”
      14. Eternity
      15. “The Angel that presided oer my birth”
      16. Morning
      17. “Great things are done when Men & Mountains meet”
      18. An answer to the parson
      19. To God
      20. To Nobodaddy
      21. “Let the Brothels of Paris be opened”
      22. “When Klopstock England defied”
      23. “The Hebrew Nation did not write it”
      24. “If it is True What the Prophets write”
      25. “I saw a chapel all of gold”
      26. Merlins prophecy
      27. Soft Snow
      28. “Abstinence sows sand all over”
      29. “What is it men in women do require”
      30. “In a wife I would desire”
      31. “When a Man has Married a Wife”
      32. “A Woman Scaly & a Man all Hairy”
      33. “Her whole Life is an Epigram”
      34. “An old maid early eer I knew”
      35. The Fairy
      36. “Never pain to tell thy love”
      37. “I asked a thief to steal me a peach”
      38. My Spectre around me night & day”
      39. [Related stanzas]
      40. “You don’t believe I wont attempt to make ye”
      41. “Mock on Mock on Voltaire Rousseau”
      42. “The only Man that eer I knew”
      43. “The Caverns of the Grave Ive seen”
      44. Riches
      45. “Since all the Riches of this World”
      46. “I rose up in the dawn of day”
      47. Blakes apology for his Catalogue
    5. [The “Auguries” (Pickering) Manuscript] (c. 1805)
      1. The Smile
      2. The Golden Net
      3. The Mental Traveller
      4. The Land of Dreams
      5. Mary
      6. The Crystal Cabinet
      7. The Gray Monk
      8. Auguries of Innocence
      9. Long John Brown & Little Mary Bell
      10. William Bond
    6. From Vala / The Four Zoas (c. 1797-1805)
    7. From Exhibition of Paintings in Fresco [Advertisement] (1809)
      1. “In the last Battle that Arthur fought . . . “
      2. The Invention of a Portable Fresco
    8. From A Descriptive Catalogue (1809)
    9. From [A Vision of the Last Judgment] (1810)
    10. From [A Public Address to the Chalcographic Society] (1809-10)
    11. [The Everlasting Gospel] (c. 1818)
    12. From The Marginalia (1789-1827)
      1. From On Lavater, Aphorisms on Man (1788)
      2. From On Swedenborg, Wisdom of Angels (1788)
      3. From On Watson, Apology for the Bible (1797)
      4. From On Bacon, Essays (1798)
      5. From On Dante, Inferno (1785; notes c. 1800)
      6. From On Reynolds, Works (1798; notes c. 1800-9)
      7. From On Spurzheim, Observations on . . . Insanity (1817)
      8. From On Wordsworth, The Excursion (1814; notes 1826)
      9. From On Wordsworth, Poems (1814; notes 1826)
      10. From On Thornton, Lord’s Prayer (1827)
    13. From The Letters
      1. To Trusler, 23 August 1799
    14. From To Cumberland, 2 July 1800
    15. From To Cumberland, 1 September 1800
      1. “Dear Generous Cumberland . . . “
    16. To Flaxman, 12 September 1800
      1. “I bless thee O Father of Heaven & Earth . . .”
    17. From To Flaxman, 21 September 1800
    18. From To Butts, 2 October 1800
      1. “To my Friend Butts I write . . .”
    19. From To Butts, 22 November 1800
    20. From To Butts, 22 November 1800 [second letter]
      1. “With happiness stretchd across the hills . . . “
    21. From To Butts, 10 January 180[3]
    22. From To James Blake, 30 January 1803
    23. From To Butts, 25 April 1803
    24. From To Butts, 6 July 1803
    25. From To Butts, 16 August 1803
      1. “O why was I born with a different face . . .”
    26. [Blake’s Memorandum, August 1803]
    27. From To Hayley, 7 October 1803
    28. From To Hayley, 23 October 1804
    29. From To Hayley, 11 December 1805
    30. To Turner, 9 June 1818
    31. To Cumberland, 12 April 1827

    Criticism

    Comments by Contemporaries

    1. Robert Hunt - From Mr Blake’s Exhibition (1809)
    2. Samuel Taylor Coleridge - Blake’s Poems, Letter to C. A. Tulk [1818]
    3. John Thomas Smith - From Nollekens and his Times (1828)
    4. Frederick Tatham - From Life of Blake (?1832)
    5. Henry Crabb Robinson - From Reminiscences (1853)
    6. Samuel Palmer - Letter to Alexander Gilchrist (1855)

    Twentieth and Twenty-first Century Perspectives

    1. Allen Ginsberg – [My Vision of Blake] (1966)
    2. Northrop Frye – Blake’s Treatment of the Archetype (1951)
    3. W. J. T. Mitchell – Dangerous Blake (1982)
    4. Joseph Viscomi – [Blake’s Relief Etching Process: A Simplifed Account] (1983)
    5. Stephen C. Behrendt – [The ‘Third Text’ of Blake’s Illuminated Books] (1999)
    6. Martin K. Nurmi – [On The Marriage of Heaven and Hell] (1957)
    7. Alicia Ostriker – Desire Gratified and Ungratified (1982)
    8. Nelson Hilton – Some Polysemous Words in Blake (1983)
    9. Jon Mee – [Blake the Bricoleur] (1992)
    10. Saree Makdisi – Fierce Rushing: William Blake and the Cultural Politics of the 1790s (2003)
    11. Julia Wright – “How Different the World to Them”: Revolutionary Heterogeneity and Alienation (2004)
    12. Morris Eaves – The Title-page of The Book of Urizen (1973)
    13. Harold Bloom – [On the Theodicy of Blake’s Milton] (1963)
    14. Vincent Arthur De Luca – A Wall of Words: The Sublime as Text (1986)

    Maps

    1. Blake’s Britain
    2. Blake’s Holy Land
    3. Blake’s London

    Textual Technicalities

    William Blake: A Chronology

    Bibliography, with Index of Scholars and Critics

    Index of Titles and First Lines