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Book Details

  • Paperback
  • August 2009
  • ISBN 978-0-393-92560-9
  • 5.7 × 9.2 in / 1088 pages
  • Territory Rights: Worldwide


Byron's Poetry and Prose

Norton Critical Editions

Paperback

George Gordon Byron (Author), Alice Levine (Editor, Hofstra University)

 

Byron's Poetry and Prose presents an extensive selection of Byron's poetry, letters, and journal entries in chronological clusters, allowing readers to see the changes that took place in his writing in the context of the places he lived and his fame, exile, and travels.

"Criticism" is chronologically keyed to Byron's poetry and reprints both classic and recent examinations of Byron's writing and life, including assessments by Anne Barton, Donald H. Reiman, Jane Stabler, Jerome J. McGann, Susan J. Wolfson, and James Chandler.

A Biographical Register, Chronology, Selected Bibliography, and Index of Poem Titles and First Lines are also included.

Endorsements & Reviews

“This careful and textually-conservative edition will serve as an excellent introductory volume to Byron for students. . . . Alice Levine is to be congratulated on bringing the Norton Byron into the twenty-first century with a resounding bang.” — Byron Journal

    Introduction

    Acknowledgments

    Abbreviations

    BYRON’S POETRY AND PROSE

    Part One: Early Years and First Pilgrimage (1803–1812)

    Poetry

    1. A Fragment (“When, to their airy hall, my fathers’ voice”)
    2. Fragment. Written Shortly After the Marriage of Miss Chaworth
    3. The Cornelian
    4. Lachin Y Gair
    5. I Would I Were a Careless Child
    6. Lines Inscribed Upon a Cup Formed From a Skull
    7. From English Bards and Scotch Reviewers
    8. Maid of Athens, Ere We Part
    9. Written after Swimming from Sestos to Abydos
    10. Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage
      1. Canto the First
      2. Canto the Second
    11. To Thyrza (“Without a stone to mark the spot”)

    Letters and Journal

    1. To Mrs. Catherine Gordon Byron (May 1–10, 1804[?])
    2. To Augusta Byron (November 6, 1805)
    3. To Elizabeth Bridget Pigot (July 5, 1807)
    4. To Elizabeth Bridget Pigot (October 26, 1807)
    5. To Robert Charles Dallas (January 21, 1808)
    6. To Charles Skinner Matthews (June 22, [1809])
    7. To Francis Hodgson (June 30, 1809), (“Huzza! Hodgson, we are going”)
    8. To Francis Hodgson (July 16, 1809),
    9. To Mrs. Catherine Gordon Byron (August 11, 1809)
    10. To Mrs. Catherine Gordon Byron (November 12, 1809)
    11. To John Cam Hobhouse (July 29, 1810)
    12. Journal: Four or Five Reasons in Favour of a Change (May 22, 1811)
    13. To Francis Hodgson (September 3, 1811)
    14. To Francis Hodgson (February 16, 1812)

    Part Two: Years of Fame in Regency Society (1812–1816)

    Poetry

    1. An Ode to the Framers of the Frame Bill
    2. The Giaour
    3. Ode to Napoleon Buonaparte
    4. From Hebrew Melodies
      1. She Walks in Beauty
      2. Sun of the Sleepless!
      3. The Destruction of Sennacherib
      4. Stanzas for Music (“They say that Hope is happiness”)
    5. Stanzas for Music (“There’s not a joy the world can give like that it takes away”)
    6. When We Two Parted
    7. Stanzas for Music (“There be none of Beauty’s daughters”)
    8. Fare Thee Well!

    Letters and Journals

    1. To Lord Holland (February 25, 1812)
    2. To Lady Caroline Lamb (May 1, 1812)
    3. To Walter Scott (July 6, 1812)
    4. To Lady Melbourne (September 25, 1812)
    5. To Lady Caroline Lamb (April 29, 1813)
    6. To John Murray (August 26, 1813)
    7. To Lady Melbourne (September 5, 1813)
    8. To Annabella Milbanke (September 6, 1813)
    9. To Lady Melbourne (September 21, 1813), (“ ’Tis said—Indifference marks the present time”)
    10. To Lady Melbourne (October 8, 1813)
    11. To Annabella Milbanke (November 29, 1813)
    12. Journal (November 16, 1813–April 10, 1814)
    13. To James Hogg (March 24, 1814)
    14. To Lady Melbourne (June 26, 1814)
    15. To Thomas Moore (September 20, 1814)
    16. To Annabella Milbanke (October 20, 1814)
    17. To Lady Melbourne (November 13, 1814)
    18. To Samuel Taylor Coleridge (October 18, 1815)
    19. To Leigh Hunt (October 30, 1815)
    20. To Lady Byron (February 8, 1816)

    Part Three: Exile on Lake Geneva (April–October 1816)

    Poetry

    1. Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage: Canto the Third
    2. The Prisoner of Chillon
      1. Sonnet on Chillon
    3. Prometheus
    4. Epistle to Augusta
    5. Darkness
    6. Manfred

    Letters and Journals

    1. To John Murray (August 28, 1816)
    2. To Augusta Leigh (September 8, 1816)
    3. From Alpine Journal (September 1816)

    Part Four: Final Pilgrimage: Italy and Greece (1816–1824)

    Poetry

    1. Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage: Canto the Fourth
    2. Beppo
    3. To the Po. June 2nd 1819
    4. From Don Juan
      1. Dedication and Canto the First
      2. From Canto the Second
      3. Canto the Third
      4. From Canto the Fourth
      5. Canto the Fifth
      6. From Canto the Ninth
      7. From Canto the Tenth
      8. Canto the Eleventh
      9. From Canto the Twelfth
      10. Canto the Thirteenth
      11. From Canto the Fourteenth
      12. From Canto the Fifteenth
      13. Canto the Sixteenth
      14. Canto the Seventeenth
    5. Francesca of Rimini
    6. The Vision of Judgment
    7. On This Day I Complete My Thirty-Sixth Year

    Letters and Journals

    1. To Thomas Moore (November 17, 1816)
    2. To John Murray (November 25, 1816), (“In this beloved marble view”)
    3. To Augusta Leigh (December 19, 1816)
    4. To Thomas Moore (December 24, 1816), (“What are you doing now, Oh Thomas Moore?”; “As the Liberty lads o’er the Sea”)
    5. To Thomas Moore (January 28, 1817)
    6. To Thomas Moore (February 28, 1817), (“So we’ll go no more a roving”)
    7. To John Murray (May 30, 1817)
    8. To Thomas Moore (July 10, 1817), (“My boat is on the shore”)
    9. To John Murray (September 15, 1817)
    10. To John Murray (January 8, 1818), (“My dear Mr. Murray”)
    11. To Thomas Moore (September 19, 1818)
    12. To Hobhouse and Kinnaird (January 19, 1819)
    13. To John Murray (April 6, 1819)
    14. To Hobhouse (April 6, 1819)
    15. To Douglas Kinnaird (April 24, 1819)
    16. To Teresa Guiccioli (April 25, 1819)
    17. To John Murray (May 15, 1819)
    18. To Augusta Leigh (May 17, 1819)
    19. To John Murray (May 18, 1819)
    20. To Augusta Leigh (July 26, 1819)
    21. To John Murray (August 1, 1819)
    22. To John Murray (August 12, 1819)
    23. To John Cam Hobhouse (August 23, 1819)
    24. To Douglas Kinnaird (October 26, 1819)
    25. To John Murray (October 29, 1819)
    26. To Richard Belgrave Hoppner (October 29, 1819)
    27. To John Murray (February 21, 1820)
    28. To John Cam Hobhouse (March 3, 1820)
    29. To Richard Belgrave Hoppner (September 10, 1820)
    30. To Thomas Moore (November 5, 1820), (“When a man hath no freedom to fight for at home”)
    31. To John Murray (November 9, 1820)
    32. To John Murray (November 18, 1820)
    33. To John Murray (December 9, 1820)
    34. To Percy Bysshe Shelley (April 26, 1821)
    35. To John Murray (July 6, 1821)
    36. To John Murray (August 31, 1821)
    37. To John Murray (September 24, 1821)
    38. From Detached Thoughts, (October 15, 1821–May 18, 1822)
    39. To Thomas Moore (March 4, 1822)
    40. To Henri Beyle (May 29, 1823)
    41. To Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (July 22, 1823)
    42. From Journal in Cephalonia (June 19 and September 28, 1823)
    43. To Yusuff Pasha (January 23, 1824)
    44. From Journal in Cephalonia (February 15, 1824)
    45. To Mr. Mayer (February 21, 1824?)

    Criticism

    Nineteenth-Century Responses

    1. William Wordsworth
      1. From Letter to John Scott (April 18, 1816)
      2. From Letter to Henry Crabb Robinson? (c. January 1820)
    2. John Keats
      1. Sonnet, “To Lord Byron” (December 1814)
      2. From Letter to George and Georgiana Keats (February 19, 1819)
      3. From Letter to George and Georgiana Keats (September 20, 1819)
    3. Percy Bysshe Shelley
      1. From Letter to Thomas Love Peacock (July 17, 1816)
      2. From Letter to Byron (May 26, 1820)
      3. From Letter to Thomas Love Peacock (August [10?], 1821)
    4. Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
      1. From Review of Don Juan (1819)
    5. Henry P. Brougham
      1. From Review of Hours of Idleness Francis Jeffrey
      2. From Review of Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage I–II
      3. From Review of Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage III, and Other Poems of 1816
    6. Francis Jeffrey
      1. From Review of Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage I-II (1812)
      2. From Review of Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage III and Other Poems of 1816 (1817)
    7. John Wilson or John Gibson Lockhart(?)
      1. Remarks on Don Juan in Blackwood’s Magazine (1819)
    8. Robert Southey
      1. [On Don Juan and the “Satanic school” of poetry] (1821)
    9. Francis Jeffrey
      1. [On Don Juan] (1822)
    10. Algernon Charles Swinburne
      1. From Preface to Selections from the Works of Lord Byron (1866)
    11. John Morley
      1. From Fortnightly Review (1870)
    12. Matthew Arnold
      1. From “Memorial Verses” (1850)
      2. From Preface to Poetry of Byron

    Twentieth-Century and Recent Criticism

    1. General Studies
      1. G. Wilson Knight, From Lord Byron: Christian Virtues
      2. Anne Barton, Byron and the Mythology of Fact
      3. Jerome J. Mc Gann, The Book of Byron and the Book of a World
      4. Malcolm Kelsall, Byron’s Politics
      5. Jane Stabler, Byron, Postmodernism and Intertextuality
    2. Studies of Individual Works
      1. Donald H. Reiman, Byron and the “Other”: Poems 1808–1814
      2. Marilyn Butler, The Orientalism of Byron’s Giaour
      3. Caroline Franklin, ‘A Soulless Toy for Tyrant’s Lust?’: The Heroine as Passive Victim
      4. Peter J. Manning, Alan Richardson, Jerome Christensen, The Sublime Self and the Single Voice
      5. Alan Richardson, Byron and the Theatre
      6. Jerome Christiansen, The Shaping Spirit of Ruin: Childe Harold IV
      7. Cheryl Fallon Giuliano, Marginal Discourse: Authority of Gossip in Beppo
      8. Peter W. Graham, Nothing So Difficult [Opening Signals in Don Juan]
      9. Susan J. Wolfson, “Their She Condition”: Cross-Dressing and the Politics of Gender in Don Juan
      10. Cecil Y. Lang, Narcissus Jilted: Byron, Don Juan and the Biographical Imperative
      11. James Chandler, “Man fell with Apples”: The Moral Mechanics of Don Juan
      12. Stuart Peterfreund, The Politics of “Neutral Space” in Byron’s Vision of Judgment

    Biographical Register

    Byron: A Chronology

    Selected Bibliography

    Index of Poem Titles and First Lines