Letters

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  1. Book ImageDelmore Schwartz and James Laughlin: Selected Letters

    Delmore Schwartz, James Laughlin, Robert Phillips

    Here follows the highs and lows of a relationship between two extraordinary personalities.More

  2. Book ImageHernando Cortés: Five Letters, 1519-1526

    Hernando Cortes, Bayard J. Morris

    “In the letters of Cortés we have a clear picture of Mexico through the simple eyes of the conqueror who admires his enemies. . . . He could write a masterly report. The second and the third letters are the clearest piece of narrative that we can ask for. We see the advance into the country, the conscientious determination to penetrate by peace, diplomacy or the sword to Montezuma’s capital, leading up to the final dramatic meeting with Montezuma himself.” —New StatesmanMore

  3. Book ImageCharles E. Ives: Memos

    Charles Ives, John Kirkpatrick

    A source book incorporating all the most important unpublished writings of America’s great composer.More

  4. Book ImageKenneth Rexroth and James Laughlin: Selected Letters

    James Laughlin, Kenneth Rexroth, Lee Bartlett

    Frankly—H. Miller was defended by me only because he spoke against the War, and I think that was the main reason for his fame. Now—I do not believe, what with Palmistry, Chirography, Phrenology, and the Great Cryptogram, he will survive the retooling period. I honestly think he is the most insufferable snob I have ever met—but all reformed pandhandlers are like that.… in a letter from Kenneth Rexroth to James LaughlinMore

  5. Book ImageWilliam Carlos Williams and James Laughlin: Selected Letters

    William Carlos Williams, James Laughlin, Hugh Witemeyer

    This volume chronicles the correspondence between William Carlos Williams, a Pullitzer Prize-winning American poet, and his publisher, James Laughlin, the founder of "New Directions".More

  6. Book ImageSigmund Freud and Lou Andreas-Salome, Letters

    Sigmund Freud, Lou Andreas-Salomé, Ernst Pfeiffer, Et Al.

    Freud’s letters contain revealing commentaries on his working methods, his concept of narcissism, and his interpretation of Moses, and they treat the themes that preoccupied him in old age: death, religion, war. Frau Andreas’s topic include her relationship to Rilke, and her reaction to his death, and the psychology of the artist.More

  7. Book ImageStaying on Alone: Letters of Alice B. Toklas

    Alice B. Toklas, Edward Burns, Gilbert A. Harrison

    If letter writing is a lost art, Staying on Alone is a measure of what has been lost.More

  8. Book ImageT.E. Lawrence: The Selected Letters

    Malcolm Brown

    Although T.E. Lawrence was one of the greatest letter writers of our century, at least two thirds of his letters collected here have never been published before. This selection contains his correspondence with Mrs. George Bernard Shaw.More

  9. Book ImageSelected Letters of Berlioz

    Hugh Macdonald, Roger Nichols

    One of the foremost composers of his generation, Berlioz was even more influential as an arbiter of musical taste and a writer of critical essays for the Parisian Journal des debats. But professional journalism was sometimes an unwelcome task for Berlioz, who felt hindered by considerations of diplomacy and censorship.More

  10. Book ImageLetters of Rainer Maria Rilke, 1892-1910

    Rainer Maria Rilke, Jane Bannard Greene, M. D. Herter Norton

    This representative selection from Rilke's large and extraordinary correspondence provides a kind of spiritual autobiography of the poet.More

  11. Book ImageLetters of Rainer Maria Rilke, 1910-1926

    Rainer Maria Rilke, Jane Bannard Greene, M. D. Herter Norton

    This volume of Rilke's letters covers the years from the completion of The Notebooks of Malte Laurids Brigge to Rilke's death in December 1926, nearly five years after he had written the Duino Elegies and the Sonnets to Orpheus, his last major works.More

  12. Book ImageWartime Letters of Rainer Maria Rilke

    Rainer Maria Rilke, M. D. Herter Norton

    The letters Rilke wrote during the war and postwar years are of particular interest not only for whatever they may contain of the wisdom of the poet, the artist, and the humanitarian, but for their analysis of the intellectual and spiritual currents of the time.More

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