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The Norton Anthology of American Literature

 

    PREFACE TO THE SHORTER SEVENTH EDITION

    ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

    Beginnings to 1700

    Introduction

    Timeline

    STORIES OF THE BEGINNING OF THE WORLD

    1. The Iroquois Creation Story (version by David Cusick)
    2. Pima Stories of the Beginning of the World (version by J. W. Lloyd)
      1. The Story of the Creation

    CHRISTOPHER COLUMBUS (1451–1506)

    1. From Letter to Luis de Santangel Regarding the First Voyage [February 15, 1493]
    2. From Letter to Ferdinand and Isabella Regarding the Fourth Voyage [July 7, 1503]

    ÁLVAR NÚÑEZ CABEZA DE VACA (ca. 1490–1558)

    1. The Relation of Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca
      1. [Dedication]
      2. [The Malhado Way of Life]
      3. [Our Life among the Avavares and Arbadaos]
      4. [Customs of That Region]
      5. [The First Confrontation]
      6. [The Falling-Out with Our Countrymen]

    THOMAS HARRIOT (1560–1621)

    1. A Brief and True Report of the New Found Land of Virginia
      1. From Of the Nature and Manners of the People

    JOHN SMITH (1580–1631)

    1. The General History of Virginia, New England, and the Summer Isles
      1. The Third Book. From Chapter 2. What Happened till the First Supply
      2. From The Fourth Book [Smith's Farewell to Virginia]
    2. From A Description of New England

    WILLIAM BRADFORD (1590–1657)

    1. Of Plymouth Plantation
      1. Book I
        1. Chapter IX. Of Their Voyage and How They Passed the Sea;and of Their Safe Arrival at Cape Cod
        2. Chapter X. Showing How They Sought Out a Place of Habitation; and What Befell Them Thereabout
      2. Book II
        1. Chapter XI. The Remainder of Anno 1620
          1. [Difficult Beginnings]
          2. [Dealings with the Natives]
        2. Chapter XII. Anno 1621 [The First Thanksgiving]
        3. Chapter XIX. Anno 1628 [Mr. Morton of Merrymount]
        4. Chapter XXIII. Anno 1632 [Prosperity Weakens Community]

    JOHN WINTHROP (1588–1649)

    1. A Model of Christian Charity

    ROGER WILLIAMS (ca. 1603–1683)

    1. A Key into the Language of America
      1. To My Dear and Well-Beloved Friends and Countrymen, in Old and New England
      2. Directions for the Use of the Language
      3. An Help to the Native Language
        1. From Chapter I. Of Salutation
        2. From Chapter XXI. Of Religion, the Soul, etc.
          1. Poem ["Two sorts of men shall naked stand"]

    ANNE BRADSTREET (ca. 1612–1672)

    1. The Prologue
    2. Contemplations
    3. The Author to Her Book
    4. Before the Birth of One of Her Children
    5. To My Dear and Loving Husband
    6. A Letter to Her Husband, Absent upon Public Employment
    7. In Memory of My Dear Grandchild Elizabeth Bradstreet
    8. Here Follows Some Verses upon the Burning of Our House
    9. To My Dear Children
    10. In Honor of that High and Mighty Princess Queen Elizabeth of Happy Memory

    MARY ROWLANDSON (ca. 1636–1711)

    1. A Narrative of the Captivity and Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson
      1. The First Remove
      2. The Second Remove
      3. The Third Remove
      4. The Twelfth Remove
      5. The Twentieth Remove

    EDWARD TAYLOR (ca. 1642–1729)

    1. Preparatory Meditations
      1. Prologue
      2. Meditation 8 (First Series)
      3. Meditation 42 (First Series)
      4. Meditation 150 (Second Series)
    2. Upon Wedlock, and Death of Children
    3. Upon a Wasp Chilled with Cold
    4. Huswifery

    COTTON MATHER (1663–1728)

    1. The Wonders of the Invisible World
      1. [A People of God in the Devil's Territories]
      2. [The Trial of Martha Carrier]

    American Literature 1700–1820

    Introduction

    Timeline

    SARAH KEMBLE KNIGHT (1666–1727)

    1. The Private Journal of a Journey from Boston to New York
      1. Saturday, October the Seventh
      2. From December the Sixth
      3. January the Sixth

    JONATHAN EDWARDS (1703–1758)

    1. Personal Narrative
    2. A Divine and Supernatural Light
    3. Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God

    NATIVE AMERICANS: CONTACT AND CONFLICT

    1. PONTIAC: Speech at Detroit
    2. SAMSON OCCOM: From A Short Narrative of My Life
    3. THOMAS JEFFERSON: Chief Logan's speech, from Notes on the State of Virginia
    4. RED JACKET: Speech to the U.S. Senate
    5. TECUMSEH: Speech to the Osages

    BENJAMIN FRANKLIN (1706–1790)

    1. The Way to Wealth
    2. Remarks Concerning the Savages of North America
    3. The Autobiography
      1. [Part One]
      2. [Part Two]

    JOHN WOOLMAN (1720–1772)

    1. The Journal of John Woolman
      1. [Early Life and Vocation]

    JOHN ADAMS (1735–1826) and ABIGAIL ADAMS (1744–1818)

    1. The Letters
      1. Abigail Adams to John Adams (August 19, 1774) [Classical Parallels]
      2. John Adams to Abigail Adams (July 23, 1775) [Dr. Franklin]
      3. John Adams to Abigail Adams (October 29, 1775) [Prejudice in Favor of New England]
      4. John Adams to Abigail Adams ( July 3, 1776) [Reflections on the Declaration of Independence]
      5. Abigail Adams to John Adams (July 14, 1776) [The Declaration. Smallpox. The Grey Horse]
      6. John Adams to Abigail Adams (July 20, 1776) [Do My Friends Think I Have Forgotten My Wife and Children?]
      7. Abigail Adams to John Adams (July 21, 1776) [Smallpox. The Proclamation for Independence Read Aloud]

    J. HECTOR ST. JOHN DE CRÈVECOEUR (1735–1813)

    1. Letters from an American Farmer
      1. From Letter III. What Is an American
      2. From Letter IX. Description of Charles-Town; thoughts on Slavery; on Physical Evil; A Melancholy Scene

    THOMAS PAINE (1737–1809)

    1. Common Sense
      1. Introduction
      2. From III. Thoughts on the Present State of American Affairs
    2. The Crisis, No. 1

    THOMAS JEFFERSON (1743–1826)

    1. The Autobiography of Thomas Jefferson
      1. From The Declaration of Independence

    THE FEDERALIST

    1. No. 1 [Alexander Hamilton]
    2. No. 10 [James Madison]

    OLAUDAH EQUIANO (1745?–1797)

    1. From The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano, or Gustavas Vassa, the African, Written by Himself
      1. From Chapter I
      2. Chapter II
      3. From Chapter III
      4. From Chapter IV
      5. From Chapter V
      6. From Chapter VI
      7. From Chapter VII

    WOMEN'S POETRY: FROM MANUSCRIPT TO PRINT

    1. JANE COLMAN TURELL
      1. To My Muse, December 29, 1725
      2. [Lines on Childbirth]
    2. ANNIS BOUDINOT STOCKTON
      1. To my Burrissa–
      2. An ode on the birth day . . . of George Washington
    3. SARAH WENTWORTH MORTON
      1. The African Chief
      2. Stanzas to a Husband Recently United
    4. MERCY OTIS WARREN
      1. A Thought on the Inestimable Blessing of Reason
      2. [Prologue for Lines] To a Patriotic Gentleman
    5. ANN ELIZA BLEECKER
      1. On the Immensity of Creation
      2. To Miss M. V. W.
    6. MARGARETTA FAUGÈRES
      1. To Aribert. October, 1790

    JUDITH SARGENT MURRAY (1751–1820)

    1. The Gleaner
      1. Chapter XI [History of Miss Wellwood]

    PHILIP FRENEAU (1752–1832)

    1. The Wild Honey Suckle
    2. The Indian Burying Ground
    3. On the Religion of Nature

    PHILLIS WHEATLEY (ca. 1753–1784)

    1. On Being Brought from Africa to America
    2. To the University of Cambridge, in New England
    3. On the Death of the Rev. Mr. George Whitefield, 1770
    4. Thoughts on the Works of Providence
    5. To S.M., A Young African Painter, on Seeing His Works
    6. To His Excellency General Washington
    7. To the Right Honorable William, Earl of Dartmouth

    American Literature 1820–1865

    Introduction

    Timeline

    WASHINGTON IRVING (1783–1859)

    1. Rip Van Winkle

    JAMES FENIMORE COOPER (1789–1851)

    1. The Last of the Mohicans
      1. Vol. I, Chapter III [Natty Bumppo and Chingachgook: Stories of the Father]

    WILLIAM CULLEN BRYANT (1794–1878)

    1. Thanatopsis
    2. To a Waterfowl
    3. The Prairies

    WILLIAM APESS (1798–1839)

    1. An Indian's Looking-Glass for the White Man

    RALPH WALDO EMERSON (1803–1882)

    1. Nature
    2. The American Scholar
    3. Self-Reliance
    4. The Poet
    5. Each and All
    6. Merlin
    7. Brahma

    NATIVE AMERICANS: REMOVAL AND RESISTANCE

    1. BLACK HAWK: From Life of Black Hawk
    2. PETALESHARO: Speech of the Pawnee Chief
      1. Speech of the Pawnee Loup Chief
    3. ELIAS BOUDINOT: From the Cherokee Phoenix
    4. Memorial of the Cherokee Citizens, November 5, 1829
    5. RALPH WALDO EMERSON: Letter to President Martin Van Buren

    NATHANIEL HAWTHORNE (1804–1864)

    1. My Kinsman, Major Molineux
    2. Young Goodman Brown
    3. The May-Pole of Merry Mount
    4. The Minister's Black Veil
    5. The Birth-Mark

    HENRY WADSWORTH LONGFELLOW (1807–1882)

    1. A Psalm of Life
    2. The Slave's Dream
    3. The Jewish Cemetery at Newport
    4. My Lost Youth

    JOHN GREENLEAF WHITTIER (1807–1892)

    1. Snow-Bound: A Winter Idyl

    EDGAR ALLAN POE (1809–1849)

    1. The Raven
    2. Annabel Lee
    3. Ligeia
    4. The Fall of the House of Usher
    5. The Tell-Tale Heart
    6. The Black Cat
    7. The Purloined Letter
    8. The Philosophy of Composition

    ABRAHAM LINCOLN (1809–1865)

    1. Address Delivered at the Dedication of the Cemetery at Gettysburg, November 19, 1863
    2. Second Inaugural Address, March 4, 1865

    MARGARET FULLER (1810–1850)

    1. The Great Lawsuit. Man versus Men. Woman versus Women.
      1. [Four Kinds of Equality]
      2. [The Great Radical Dualism]

    SLAVERY, RACE, AND THE MAKING OF AMERICAN LITERATURE

    1. THOMAS JEFFERSON: From Notes on the State of Virginia
    2. DAVID WALKER: From David Walker's Appeal in Four Articles
    3. WILLIAM LLOYD GARRISON: To the Public
    4. ANGELINA E. GRIMK…: From Appeal to the Christian Women of the South
    5. SOJOURNER TRUTH: Speech to the Women's Rights Convention in Akron, Ohio, 1851
    6. MARTIN R. DELANY: From Political Destiny of the Colored Race on the American Continent

    HARRIET BEECHER STOWE (1811–1896)

    1. Uncle Tom's Cabin; or Life among the Lowly
      1. Chapter VII. The Mother's Struggle
      2. Chapter IX. In Which It Appears That a Senator Is but a Man
      3. Chapter XII. Select Incident of Lawful Trade

    FANNY FERN (SARAH WILLIS PARTON) (1811–1872)

    1. Male Criticism on Ladies' Books
    2. "Fresh Leaves, by Fanny Fern"

    HARRIET JACOBS (ca. 1813–1897)

    1. Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl
      1. I. Childhood
      2. VII. The Lover
      3. X. A Perilous Passage in the Slave Girl's Life
      4. XIV. Another Link to Life
      5. XXI. The Loophole of Retreat
      6. XLI. Free at Last

    HENRY DAVID THOREAU (1817–1862)

    1. Resistance to Civil Government
    2. Walden, or Life in the Woods
      1. 1. Economy
      2. 2. Where I Lived, and What I Lived For
      3. 5. Solitude
      4. 17. Spring
      5. Conclusion

    FREDERICK DOUGLASS (1818–1895)

    1. Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, Written by Himself
    2. What to the Slave Is the Fourth of July?

    WALT WHITMAN (1819–1892)

    1. Preface to Leaves of Grass (1855)
    2. Inscriptions
      1. One's Self I Sing
      2. Shut Not Your Doors
    3. Song of Myself (1881)
    4. Children of Adam
      1. Spontaneous Me
      2. Facing West from California's Shores
    5. Crossing Brooklyn Ferry
    6. Sea-Drift
      1. Out of the Cradle Endlessly Rocking
    7. By the Roadside
      1. When I Heard the Learn'd Astronomer
      2. The Dalliance of Eagles
    8. Drum-Taps
      1. Beat! Beat! Drums!
      2. Cavalry Crossing a Ford
      3. The Wound-Dresser
    9. Memories of President Lincoln
      1. When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom'd
    10. Letter to Ralph Waldo Emerson
    11. Live Oak, with Moss

    HERMAN MELVILLE (1819–1891)

    1. Bartleby, the Scrivener
    2. Benito Cereno
    3. Battle-Pieces
      1. The Portent
      2. A Utilitarian View of the Monitor's Flight

    ELIZABETH DREW STODDARD (1823–1902)

    1. Lemorne versus Huell

    FRANCES ELLEN WATKINS HARPER (1825–1911)

    1. Eliza Harris
    2. Ethiopia
    3. The Fugitive's Wife
    4. The Tennessee Hero
    5. Bury Me in a Free Land

    EMILY DICKINSON (1830–1886)

    1. 39 [49] [I never lost as much but twice - ]
    2. 112 [67] [Success is counted sweetest]
    3. 122 [130] [These are the days when Birds come back - ]
    4. 124 [216] [Safe in their Alabaster Chambers - ]
    5. 202 [185] ["Faith" is a fine invention]
    6. 207 [214] [I taste a liquor never brewed - ]
    7. 236 [324] [Some keep the Sabbath going to Church - ]
    8. 259 [287] [A Clock stopped - ]
    9. 260 [288] [I'm Nobody! Who are you?]
    10. 269 [249] [Wild Nights - Wild Nights!]
    11. 320 [258] [There's a certain Slant of light]
    12. 339 [241] [I like a look of Agony]
    13. 340 [280] [I felt a Funeral, in my Brain]
    14. 347 [348] [I dreaded that first Robin, so]
    15. 348 [505] [I would not paint - a picture - ]
    16. 355 [510] [It was not Death, for I stood up]
    17. 359 [328] [A Bird came down the Walk - ]
    18. 365 [338] [I know that He exists]
    19. 372 [341] [After great pain, a formal feeling comes - ]
    20. 373 [501] [This World is not conclusion]
    21. 409 [303] [The Soul selects her own Society - ]
    22. 411 [528] [Mine – by the Right of the White Election!]
    23. 446 [448] [This was a Poet - ]
    24. 448 [449] [I died for Beauty - but was scarce]
    25. 479 [712] [Because I could not stop for Death - ]
    26. 519 [441] [This is my letter to the World]
    27. 591 [465] [I heard a Fly buzz - when I died - ]
    28. 598 [632] [The Brain - is wider than the Sky - ]
    29. 620 [435] [Much Madness is divinest Sense - ]
    30. 627 [593] [I think I was enchanted]
    31. 656 [520] [I started Early – Took my Dog - ]
    32. 760 [650] [Pain - has an Element of Blank - ]
    33. 764 [754] [My Life had stood - a Loaded Gun - ]
    34. 788 [709] [Publication - is the Auction]
    35. 1096 [986] [A narrow Fellow in the Grass]
    36. 1108 [1078] [The Bustle in a House]
    37. 1263 [1129] [Tell all the Truth but tell it slant - ]
    38. 1668 [1624] [Apparently with no surprise]
    39. 1577 [1545] [The Bible is an antique Volume - ]
    40. 1773 [1732] [My life closed twice before it's close]
    41. Letter Exchange with Susan Gilbert Dickinson on Poem 124 [216]

    REBECCA HARDING DAVIS (1831–1910)

    1. Life in the Iron-Mills

    American Literature 1865–1914

    Introduction

    Timeline

    WALT WHITMAN (1819–1892)

    1. Song of Myself (1881)
    2. Crossing Brooklyn Ferry
    3. The Wound-Dresser
    4. When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom’d

    EMILY DICKINSON (1830–1886)

    1. 122 [130] [These are the days when Birds come back - ]
    2. 207 [214] [I taste a liquor never brewed - ]
    3. 236 [324] [Some keep the Sabbath going to Church - ]
    4. 260 [288] [I’m Nobody! Who are you?]
    5. 269 [249] [Wild Nights - Wild Nights!]
    6. 320 [258] [There’s a certain Slant of light]
    7. 339 [241] [I like a look of Agony]
    8. 340 [280] [I felt a Funeral, in my Brain]
    9. 359 [328] [A Bird came down the Walk - ]
    10. 365 [338] [I know that He exists]
    11. 409 [303] [The Soul selects her own Society - ]
    12. 411 [528] [Mine - by the Right of the White Election!]
    13. 446 [448] [This was a Poet - ]
    14. 479 [712] [Because I could not stop for Death - ]
    15. 519 [441] [This is my letter to the World]
    16. 591 [465] [I heard a Fly buzz - when I died - ]
    17. 620 [435] [Much Madness is divinest Sense - ]
    18. 656 [520] [I started Early - Took my Dog - ]
    19. 764 [754] [My Life had stood - a Loaded Gun - ]
    20. 788 [709] [Publication - is the Auction]
    21. 1096 [986] [A narrow Fellow in the Grass]
    22. 1263 [1129] [Tell all the Truth but tell it slant - ]
    23. 1577 [1545] [The Bible is an antique Volume - ]

    MARK TWAIN (Samuel L. Clemens) (1835–1910)

    1. The Notorious Jumping Frog of Calaveras County
    2. Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

    W. D. HOWELLS (1837–1920)

    1. Editha

    AMBROSE BIERCE (1842–1914?)

    1. An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge

    BRET HARTE (1836–1902)

    1. The Luck of Roaring Camp

    HENRY JAMES (1843–1916)

    1. Daisy Miller: A Study
    2. The Real Thing
    3. The Beast in the Jungle

    SARAH WINNEMUCCA (ca. 1844–1891)

    1. Life Among the Piutes
      1. From Chapter I. First Meeting of Piutes and Whites
      2. From Chapter II. Domestic and Social Moralities
      3. From Chapter VIII. The Yakima Affair

    SARAH ORNE JEWETT (1849–1909)

    1. A White Heron

    EMMA LAZARUS (1849–1887)

    1. In the Jewish Synagogue at Newport
    2. 1492
    3. The New Colossus

    KATE CHOPIN (1850–1904)

    1. At the ’Cadian Ball
    2. The Storm
    3. Désirée’s Baby

    MARY E. WILKINS FREEMAN (1852–1930)

    1. A New England Nun

    BOOKER T. WASHINGTON (1856–1915)

    1. Up from Slavery
      1. Chapter XIV. The Atlanta Exposition Address

    CHARLES W. CHESNUTT (1858–1932)

    1. The Wife of His Youth
    2. The Passing of Grandison

    ABRAHAM CAHAN (1860–1951)

    1. A Sweat-Shop Romance

    PAULINE HOPKINS (1859–1930)

    1. Contending Forces
      1. From Chapter III. “Coming Events Cast Their Shadows Before”
      2. From Chapter IV. The Tragedy
      3. From Chapter XIII. The American Colored League
      4. Chapter XIV. Luke Sawyer Speaks to the League

    CHARLOTTE PERKINS GILMAN (1860–1935)

    1. The Yellow Wall-paper

    EDITH WHARTON (1862–1937)

    1. The Other Two
    2. Roman Fever

    SUI SIN FAR (Edith Maud Eaton) (1865–1914)

    1. In the Land of the Free

    W. E. B. DU BOIS (1868–1963)

    1. The Souls of Black Folk
      1. I. Of Our Spiritual Strivings
      2. III. Of Mr. Booker T. Washington and Others

    REALISM AND NATURALISM

    1. WILLIAM DEAN HOWELLS: From Novel Writing and Novel Reading
    2. HENRY JAMES: From The Art of Fiction
    3. FRANK NORRIS: A Plea for Romantic Fiction
    4. THEODORE DREISER: True Art Speaks Plainly
    5. JACK LONDON: From What Life Means to Me

    THEODORE DREISER (1871–1945)

    1. Sister Carrie
      1. Chapter I
      2. Chapter III

    STEPHEN CRANE (1871–1900)

    1. The Open Boat
    2. The Blue Hotel
    3. From The Black Riders
    4. From War Is Kind

    PAUL LAURENCE DUNBAR (1872–1906)

    1. When Malindy Sings
    2. An Ante-Bellum Sermon
    3. Sympathy
    4. We Wear the Mask
    5. Frederick Douglass
    6. Harriet Beecher Stowe

    JACK LONDON (1876–1916)

    1. To Build a Fire

    ZITKALA ŠA (Gertrude Simmons Bonnin) (1876–1938)

    1. Impressions of an Indian Childhood
      1. I. My Mother
      2. II. The Legends
      3. IV. The Coffee-Making
      4. VII. The Big Red Apples
    2. The Soft-Hearted Sioux

    DEBATES OVER “AMERICANIZATION”

    1. FREDERICK JACKSON TURNER: From The Significance of the Frontier in American History
    2. THEODORE ROOSEVELT: From American Ideals
      1. From The Strenuous Life
    3. HELEN HUNT JACKSON: From A Century of Dishonor
    4. JOSÉ MARTÍ: From Our America
    5. CHARLES W. CHESNUTT: A Defamer of his Race
    6. JANE ADDAMS: From Twenty Years at Hull-House
    7. ANNA JULIA COOPER: One Phase of American Literature

    American Literature 1914–1945

    Introduction

    Timeline

    EDWIN ARLINGTON ROBINSON (1869–1935)

    1. Luke Havergal
    2. Richard Cory
    3. Miniver Cheevy
    4. Mr. Flood’s Party

    WILLA CATHER (1873–1947)

    1. Neighbour Rosicky
    2. The Sculptor’s Funeral

    AMY LOWELL (1874–1925)

    1. The Captured Goddess
    2. Venus Transiens
    3. Madonna of the Evening Flowers
    4. September, 1918
    5. St. Louis
    6. New Heavens for Old

    GERTRUDE STEIN (1874–1946)

    1. Tender Buttons
      1. Objects

    ROBERT FROST (1874–1963)

    1. The Pasture
    2. Mowing
    3. Mending Wall
    4. The Death of the Hired Man
    5. After Apple-Picking
    6. The Wood-Pile
    7. The Road Not Taken
    8. Birches
    9. “Out, Out—”
    10. Fire and Ice
    11. Nothing Gold Can Stay
    12. Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening
    13. Desert Places
    14. Design
    15. Neither Out Far Nor In Deep
    16. Directive

    SUSAN GLASPELL (1876–1948)

    1. Trifles

    SHERWOOD ANDERSON (1876–1941)

    1. Winesburg, Ohio
      1. Hands
      2. Mother

    CARL SANDBURG (1878–1967)

    1. Chicago
    2. Fog
    3. Grass

    WALLACE STEVENS (1879–1955)

    1. The Snow Man
    2. A High-Toned Old Christian Woman
    3. The Emperor of Ice-Cream
    4. Disillusionment of Ten O’Clock
    5. Sunday Morning
    6. Anecdote of the Jar
    7. Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Blackbird
    8. The Idea of Order at Key West
    9. Of Modern Poetry

    MINA LOY (1882–1966)

    1. Parturition
    2. Brancusi’s Golden Bird
    3. Lunar Baedeker

    WILLIAM CARLOS WILLIAMS (1883–1963)

    1. The Young Housewife
    2. Portrait of a Lady
    3. Queen-Anne’s-Lace
    4. The Widow’s Lament in Springtime
    5. Spring and All
    6. To Elsie
    7. The Red Wheelbarrow
    8. This Is Just to Say
    9. A Sort of a Song
    10. The Dance (“In Brueghel’s great picture, The Kermess”)
    11. Landscape with the Fall of Icarus
    12. The Dance (“When the snow falls the flakes”)

    EZRA POUND (1885–1972)

    1. To Whistler, American
    2. Portrait d’une Femme
    3. A Pact
    4. In a Station of the Metro
    5. The River-Merchant’s Wife: A Letter
    6. The Cantos
      1. I (“And then went down to the ship”)

    H. D. (HILDA DOOLITTLE) (1886–1961)

    1. Mid-day
    2. Oread
    3. Leda
    4. Fragment 113
    5. Helen

    MARIANNE MOORE (1887–1972)

    1. Poetry
    2. To a Snail
    3. The Paper Nautilus
    4. The Mind Is an Enchanting Thing
    5. In Distrust of Merits

    T. S. ELIOT (1888–1965)

    1. The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock
    2. Gerontion
    3. The Waste Land
    4. The Hollow Men
    5. Journey of the Magi
    6. Four Quartets
      1. Burnt Norton

    EUGENE O’NEILL (1888–1953)

    1. Long Day’s Journey into Night

    CLAUDE McKAY (1889–1948)

    1. The Harlem Dancer
    2. Harlem Shadows
    3. The Lynching
    4. If We Must Die
    5. Africa
    6. America

    KATHERINE ANNE PORTER (1890–1980)

    1. Flowering Judas

    ZORA NEALE HURSTON (1891–1960)

    1. How It Feels to Be Colored Me
    2. The Gilded Six-Bits

    EDNA ST. VINCENT MILLAY (1892–1950)

    1. Recuerdo
    2. I Think I Should Have Loved You Presently
    3. Apostrophe to Man
    4. I Too beneath Your Moon, Almighty Sex
    5. I Forgot for a Moment

    E. E. CUMMINGS (1894–1962)

    1. Thy fingers make early flowers of
    2. in Just-
    3. O sweet spontaneous
    4. Buffalo Bill’s
    5. “next to of course god america i
    6. i sing of Olaf glad and big
    7. somewhere i have never travelled,gladly beyond
    8. anyone lived in a pretty how town

    JEAN TOOMER (1894–1967)

    1. Cane
      1. Georgia Dusk
      2. Fern
      3. Portrait in Georgia
      4. Seventh Street

    F. SCOTT FITZGERALD (1896–1940)

    1. Winter Dreams
    2. Babylon Revisited

    WILLIAM FAULKNER (1897–1962)

    1. A Rose for Emily
    2. Barn Burning

    HART CRANE (1899–1932)

    1. Chaplinesque
    2. At Melville’s Tomb
    3. Voyages
      1. I (“Above the fresh ruffles of the surf”)
      2. III (“Infinite consanguinity it bears—”)
      3. V (“Meticulous, past midnight in clear rime”)

    ERNEST HEMINGWAY (1899–1961)

    1. The Snows of Kilimanjaro

    STERLING BROWN (1901–1989)

    1. Mister Samuel and Sam
    2. Master and Man
    3. Break of Day
    4. Bitter Fruit of the Tree

    LANGSTON HUGHES (1902–1967)

    1. The Negro Speaks of Rivers
    2. Mother to Son
    3. I, Too
    4. The Weary Blues
    5. Mulatto
    6. Song for a Dark Girl
    7. Visitors to the Black Belt
    8. Note on Commercial Theatre
    9. Democracy
    10. Theme for English B

    JOHN STEINBECK (1902–1968)

    1. The Leader of the People

    COUNTEE CULLEN (1903–1946)

    1. Yet Do I Marvel
    2. Incident
    3. Heritage

    RICHARD WRIGHT (1908–1960)

    1. The Man Who Was Almost a Man

    CARLOS BOLUSAN (1911–1956)

    1. Be American

    American Literature since 1945

    Introduction

    Timeline

    THEODORE ROETHKE (1908–1963)

    1. Cuttings
    2. Cuttings (later)
    3. My Papa’s Waltz
    4. Dolor
    5. The Waking
    6. Elegy for Jane
    7. I Knew a Woman

    EUDORA WELTY (1909–2001)

    1. Petrified Man

    TENNESSEE WILLIAMS (1911–1983)

    1. A Streetcar Named Desire

    ELIZABETH BISHOP (1911–1979)

    1. The Fish
    2. At the Fishhouses
    3. The Armadillo
    4. Sestina
    5. In the Waiting Room
    6. One Art

    JOHN CHEEVER (1912–1982)

    1. The Swimmer

    ROBERT HAYDEN (1913–1980)

    1. Middle Passage
    2. Homage to the Empress of the Blues
    3. Those Winter Sundays

    RANDALL JARRELL (1914–1965)

    1. The Death of the Ball Turret Gunner
    2. Second Air Force
    3. Thinking of the Lost World

    RALPH ELLISON (1914–1994)

    1. Invisible Man
      1. Chapter I [Battle Royal]

    JOHN BERRYMAN (1914–1972)

    1. Homage to Mistress Bradstreet
      1. 17–39
    2. Dream Songs
      1. 29 (“There sat down, once, a thing on Henry’s heart”)
      2. 45 (“He stared at ruin. Ruin stared straight back”)
      3. 385 (“My daughter’s heavier. Light leaves are flying”)

    SAUL BELLOW (1915–2005)

    1. The Adventures of Augie March
      1. Chapter One

    ARTHUR MILLER (1915–2005)

    1. Death of a Salesman

    ROBERT LOWELL (1917–1977)

    1. The Quaker Graveyard in Nantucket
    2. Mr. Edwards and the Spider
    3. Skunk Hour
    4. For the Union Dead

    GWENDOLYN BROOKS (1917–2000)

    1. A Street in Bronzeville
      1. kitchenette building
      2. the mother
      3. The White Troops Had Their Orders But the Negroes Looked Like Men
    2. we real cool
    3. The Last Quatrain of the Ballad of Emmett Till
    4. To the Diaspora

    JACK KEROUAC (1922–1969)

    1. Big Sur
      1. Chapter 12
      2. Chapter 13
      3. Chapter 14

    DENISE LEVERTOV (1923–1997)

    1. To the Snake
    2. The Jacob’s Ladder
    3. In Mind
    4. Death in Mexico

    JAMES BALDWIN (1924–1987)

    1. Going to Meet the Man

    FLANNERY O’CONNOR (1925–1964)

    1. Good Country People

    A. R. AMMONS (1926–2001)

    1. So I Said I Am Ezra
    2. Corsons Inlet
    3. Easter Morning

    ALLEN GINSBERG (1926–1997)

    1. Howl
    2. Footnote to Howl
    3. A Supermarket in California

    GALWAY KINNELL (b. 1927)

    1. The Porcupine
    2. After Making Love We Hear Footsteps

    JOHN ASHBERY (b. 1927)

    1. Illustration
    2. Soonest Mended
    3. Myrtle

    JAMES WRIGHT (1927–1980)

    1. Autumn Begins in Martins Ferry, Ohio
    2. To the Evening Star: Central Minnesota
    3. A Blessing

    ANNE SEXTON (1928–1974)

    1. The Starry Night
    2. Sylvia’s Death
    3. Little Girl, My String Bean, My Lovely Woman

    ADRIENNE RICH (b. 1929)

    1. Storm Warnings
    2. Snapshots of a Daughter-in-Law
    3. A Valediction Forbidding Mourning
    4. Diving into the Wreck
    5. Transcendental Etude
    6. Shattered Head

    GARY SNYDER (b. 1930)

    1. Riprap
    2. August on Sourdough, A Visit from Dick Brewer
    3. Beneath My Hand and Eye the Distant Hills. Your Body

    TONI MORRISON (b. 1931)

    1. Recitatif

    SYLVIA PLATH (1932–1963)

    1. Morning Song
    2. Lady Lazarus
    3. Daddy
    4. Blackberrying
    5. Child

    JOHN UPDIKE (b. 1932)

    1. Separating

    PHILIP ROTH (b. 1933)

    1. Defender of the Faith

    AUDRE LORDE (1934–1992)

    1. Coal
    2. The Woman Thing
    3. Harriet

    AMIRI BARAKA (LeRoi Jones) (b. 1934)

    1. An Agony. As Now.
    2. A Poem for Willie Best

    N. SCOTT MOMADAY (b. 1934)

    1. The Way to Rainy Mountain
      1. Headwaters
      2. Introduction
      3. IV
      4. XIII
      5. XVII
      6. XXIV
      7. Epilogue
      8. Rainy Mountain Cemetery

    LUCILLE CLIFTON (b. 1936)

    1. miss rosie
    2. the lost baby poem
    3. homage to my hips
    4. wild blessings
    5. wishes for sons
    6. the mississippi river empties into the gulf
    7. [oh antic god]

    THOMAS PYNCHON (b. 1937)

    1. Entropy

    MICHAEL S. HARPER (b. 1938)

    1. Dear John, Dear Coltrane
    2. American History
    3. Martin’s Blues

    RAYMOND CARVER (1938–1988)

    1. Cathedral

    MAXINE HONG KINGSTON (b. 1940)

    1. No Name Woman

    BILLY COLLINS (b. 1941)

    1. Forgetfulness
    2. I Chop Some Parsley While Listening to Art Blakey’s Version of “Three Blind Mice”
    3. The Night House

    SIMON J. ORTIZ (b. 1941)

    1. Earth and Rain, the Plants & Sun
    2. Vision Shadows
    3. Poems from the Veterans Hospital
      1. Travelling
    4. From Sand Creek

    GLORIA ANZALDÚA (1942–2004)

    1. How to Tame a Wild Tongue

    ALICE WALKER (b. 1944)

    1. Everyday Use

    YUSEF KOMUNYAKAA (b. 1947)

    1. Facing It
    2. My Father’s Love Letters
    3. Slam, Dunk and Hook
    4. When Dusk Weighs Daybreak
    5. Jasmine

    LESLIE MARMON SILKO (b. 1948)

    1. Lullaby

    JULIA ALVAREZ (b. 1950)

    1. ¡Yo!
      1. The Mother

    JORIE GRAHAM (b. 1950)

    1. The Geese
    2. At Luca Signorelli’s Resurrection of the Body

    JOY HARJO (b. 1951)

    1. Call It Fear
    2. White Bear

    RITA DOVE (b. 1952)

    1. Banneker
    2. Parsley
    3. Adolescence—I
    4. Adolescence—II
    5. Rosa
    6. Fox Trot Fridays

    ALBERTO RÍOS (b. 1952)

    1. Madre Sofía
    2. Wet Camp
    3. Advice to a First Cousin

    SANDRA CISNEROS (b. 1954)

    1. Woman Hollering Creek

    LOUISE ERDRICH (b. 1954)

    1. Dear John Wayne
    2. I Was Sleeping Where the Black Oaks Move
    3. Grief
    4. Fleur

    CATHY SONG (b. 1955)

    1. The White Porch
    2. Lost Sister
    3. Heaven

    LI-YOUNG LEE (b. 1957)

    1. Persimmons
    2. Eating Alone
    3. Eating Together
    4. This Room and Everything in It

    SHERMAN ALEXIE (b. 1966)

    1. At Navajo Monument Valley Tribal School
    2. Pawn Shop
    3. Crow Testament
    4. Do Not Go Gentle

    JHUMPA LAHIRI (b. 1967)

    1. Sexy

    SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHIES

    PERMISSIONS ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

    INDEX