Related to This Book

Other Sites



The UnAmericans

Stories

Molly Antopol (Author)

Overview | Formats
 

A stunning exploration of characters shaped by the forces of history, the debut work of fiction by a National Book Foundation "5 Under 35" Honoree.

Moving from modern-day Jerusalem to McCarthy-era Los Angeles to communist Prague and back again, The UnAmericans is a stunning exploration of characters shaped by the forces of history. Molly Antopol’s critically acclaimed debut will long be remembered for its "poise and gravity" (New York Times), each story "so full of heartache and humor, love and life…[it’s] as though we’re absorbing a novel’s worth of insight" (Jesmyn Ward, Salon).

Book Details

  • Paperback
  • October 2014
  • ISBN 978-0-393-34996-2
  • 5.5 × 8.2 in / 288 pages
  • Sales Territory: Worldwide including Canada, Singapore and Malaysia, but excluding the British Commonwealth.

Other Formats

  1. Book CoverThe UnAmericans: Stories

    Hardcover

Endorsements & Reviews

“[Will] make you nostalgic, not just for earlier times, but for another era in short fiction. A time when writers such as Bernard Malamud, and Issac Bashevis Singer and Grace Paley roamed the earth.” — Meg Wolitzer, NPR

“Fresh and offbeat… memorable and promising.” — Dwight Garner, New York Times

“A memorable collection of melancholic vignettes about identity, place, and coupling.” — Ann Hulbert, The Atlantic

The Unamericans is poised to be this year's sensation… the layered riches and historical sweep of its stories make them feel grand, like novels writ small.” — Esquire Magazine

“Wilson’s examples of insect eusociality are dazzling… There are obvious parallels with human practices like war and agriculture, but Wilson is also sensitive to the differences… This book offers a detailed reconstruction of what we know about the evolutionary histories of these two very different conquerors. Wilson’s careful and clear analysis reminds us that scientific accounts of our origins aren’t just more accurate than religious stories; they are also a lot more interesting.” — Carmela Ciuraru, San Francisco Chronicle

“A sweeping account of the human rise to domination of the biosphere, rounded out with broad reflections on art, ethics, language and religion.” — Laura Moser, Jewish Daily Forward

“Biologist E. O. Wilson’s brilliant new volume, The Social Conquest of Earth, could more aptly be entitled ‘Biology’s Conquest of Science’. Drawing on his deep understanding of entomology and his extraordinarily broad knowledge of the natural and social sciences, Wilson makes a strong case for the synthesis of knowledge across disciplines. Understanding the biological origin of what makes us human can help us to build better theories of social and psychological interaction; in turn, understanding how other social species have evolved may help us to better understand the origin of our own. But the main reason that Wilson’s book is successful is that he also brings into biology the best of what social science has to offer.” — Adam Johnson, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The Orphan Master's Son

“Wilson’s newest theory...could transform our understanding of human nature—and provide hope for our stewardship of the planet.... [His] new book is not limited to the discussion of evolutionary biology, but ranges provocatively through the humanities.... Its impact on the social sciences could be as great as its importance for biology, advancing human self-understanding in ways typically associated with the great philosophers.” — Jesmyn Ward, author of Sing, Unburied, Sing

“A sweeping argument about the biological origins of complex human culture. It is full of both virtuosity and raw, abrupt assertions that are nonetheless well-crafted and captivating... it is fascinating to see such a distinguished scientist optimistic about the future.” — Abraham Verghese, author of Cutting for Stone

The Social Conquest of the Earth has set off a scientific furor... The controversy is fueled by a larger debate about the evolution of altruism. Can true altruism even exist? Is generosity a sustainable trait? Or are living things inherently selfish, our kindness nothing but a mask? This is science with existential stakes.” — Ken Kalfus, author of A Disorder Peculiar to the Country and Equilateral

“Religion. Sports. War. Biologist E.O. Wilson says our drive to join a group—and to fight for it—is what makes us human.” — Lauren Groff, author of Fates and Furies

“That Wilson provides nimble, lucid responses to the three core questions, speaks volumes about his intellectual rigor. That he covers all of this heady terrain in less than 300 pages of text speaks volumes about his literary skill.” — Joan Silber, author of Improvement

“Starred review. With bracing insights into instinct, language, organized religion, the humanities, science, and social intelligence, this is a deeply felt, powerfully written, and resounding inquiry into the human condition.” — Peter Orner, author of Last Car Over the Saramore Bridge and Love and Shame and Love

“An ambitious and thoroughly engaging work that’s certain to generate controversy within the walls of academia and without… Provocative, eloquent and unflinchingly forthright, Wilson remains true to form, producing a book that’s anything but dull and bound to receive plenty of attention from supporters and critics alike.” — Christine Schutt, author of Florida and All Souls

“"Where do we come from? What are we? Where are we going?” Those famous questions, inscribed by Paul Gauguin in his giant Tahitian painting of 1897, introduce The Social Conquest of Earth. Their choice proclaims Edward O Wilson’s ambitions for his splendid book, in which he sums up 60 distinguished years of research into the evolution of human beings and social insects.” — Dara Horn, author of Eternal Life

All Subjects