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Rosanna Warren

Rosanna Warren, the author of four collections of poetry, has received awards from the Academy of Arts and Letters and has won the Lamont Poetry Prize. She teaches at the University of Chicago and lives in Chicago.

Books by Rosanna Warren

  1. Book CoverThe Collected Poems of Eugenio Montale: 1925-1977


    A majestic translation of one of the Nobel Prize-winning masters of twentieth-century poetry.More

  2. Book CoverDeparture: Poems


    "An important poet...beyond the achievement of all but a double handful of living American poets."—Harold BloomMore

  3. Book CoverEach Leaf Shines Separate


    In this stunning first book, Rosanna Warren writes with wisdom, grace, and pure intelligence “as though to seize on a new life.” Exploring the complexities of nature and art, she traces continuous travail between the earth—in its tangle of roots and cyclical consolation—and the restless and protesting mind. Thus we encounter the struggle for sustaining generations of life in the villages of Europe, the ruins of Crete, a fresco or bas-relief.More

  4. Book CoverFables of the Self: Studies in Lyric Poetry


    A landmark work—part personal narrative, part critical exploration—by a distinguished American poet.More

  5. Book CoverGhost in a Red Hat: Poems


    “Achieves a delicate balance between structural solidity and movement. . . . Warren’s latest poems tend to veil their complexity in understatement.”—Harvard ReviewMore

  6. Book CoverPoetic Diaries 1971 and 1972


    Poetic Diaries 1971 and 1972 is one of the Nobel Prize–winning poet Eugenio Montale’s final works, and it reveals the last act of the twentieth-century master to be one of splendid negation.More

  7. Book CoverPoetic Notebook 1974–1977


    Poetic Notebook 1974–1977, one of the final volumes assembled by Eugenio Montale before his death, shows the last act of the twentieth-century master to be one of splendid negation.More

  8. Book CoverStained Glass


    Stained Glass is a distinguished and elegiac book: somber, frequently bitter, but always invested with an authentic, quite marvelous aesthetic dignity. It marks the emergence into highly individual voice of an important poet of the eminence of the late May Swenson, beyond the achievement of all but a double handful of living American poets. Some of the poems—‘Season Due,’ ‘Science Lessons,’ most of all, ‘The Broken Pot’—are worthy of canonization. —Harold BloomMore